Giving Tuesday

After Black Friday and Cyber Monday…there is Giving Tuesday.  How many of us “spent”  these past few days?  I hope you will take the time today to give a little to the Society for the History of Navy Medicine.   We have very minimal membership fees and with that money we fund conferences, grants, and book prizes.  We hope to make a graduate student travel award available for our upcoming conference in San Antonio in March, 2018.  We hope our members will renew their memberships and even give a little more. Just go to the website: https://historyofnavymedicine.org/ and click on the “Contribute” tab.  There you will find our TAX ID number and ways to make a tax deductible gift.  We even have a “Donate” button through Paypal.

This morning I’ve “given” to a number of worthy organizations, the SHNM included.  It’s the time of year to count blessings.  If you are able to give, thank you very, very much.

Annette Finley-Croswhite, Ph.D., Executive Director, Society for the History of Navy Medicine

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It’s that time of year!

Dear Society Members,

On New Year’s Eve is coming; please consider making a tax deductible contribution to the Society for the History of Navy Medicine.  All monies go to very good causes such as funding our graduate student travel award and graduate student research award.

A small contribution of just $30 might seem insignificant, but in the big picture, it helps to get our graduate students to our conferences. You may not be aware of this, but as universities have become more corporate entities (as is the trend throughout the United States), fellowships and tuition waivers are being reduced or cancelled.   In fact, at my University, tuition waivers don’t exist anymore for graduate students in my college as they did a decade ago.  This means graduate students have to pay their own tuition out of their very small stipends.   This situation may not be true for graduate students at the top-tier universities, but overall the last ten years have seen universities reduce graduate student stipends and tuition waivers just as faculty salaries have stayed stagnant or in many cases have also been reduced.  And it is worse for graduate students because  the cost of living has increased tremendously.  Many graduate student have to resort to student loans to offset small stipends, and many do not have any healthcare at all.  This is the world we now live in today in Higher Education.

So please, think about making this contribution, today.  We are planning a fantastic conference for 2018 focused on World War I, and I would like to get a whole panel of graduate students there if possible.  Conferences are marvelous venues to network and to learn more about professionalism within an academic environment and of course, to share intellectual ideas.

Thank you in advance, if you are able to support our Society, and in particular, our graduate students.  All you have to do is go to the Society main page at: https://historyofnavymedicine.org/contribute/ and hit contribute.  That will take you to our “donate” button.  All contributions are tax deductible.

Respectfully,

Annette Finley-Croswhite, Ph.D., Executive Director

Happy Holidays

Towards the end of this year I’ve been trying to educate myself a bit about Navy Nurses. I read a wonderful book by Emily Mayhew called “Wounded” that talks about Army nurses during World War I. In fact, World War I opened up so many opportunities for women. In 1917 when the US entered World War I there were only 160 Navy Nurses, and by 1918 there were 1550. Many of these women were loaned to the Army because of a shortage of nurses on the Western Front, and so many Navy nurses served in France in particular. I am a French historian, so that interests me in particular. I have included a picture here taken on the USS Pocahontas en route to France in 1918 featuring 4 Navy nurses.

The holidays are here and I’m sure we are all very busy with family plans and activities. I wanted to take a moment out of my schedule to wish all members of the Society for the History of Navy Medicine a wonderful holiday season. As I think more and more about the centennial commemoration of World War I, I often think of the Christmas truce which occurred 100 Years ago tomorrow night. It is commonly told that on that evening British and German troops put down their arms and began singing carols, eventually visited each other and playing soccer. A similar truce was held on the Eastern Front.

Our Society is made up of people of all backgrounds. I wish everyone Happy Holidays and hope you have a wonderful Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Christmas or whatever celebration you enjoy this time of year.

Annette Finley-Croswhite, Executive Director.

Picture fro the Naval history and Heritage Command, NHH 82963

Navy Nurses go to France

Happy Holidays

Towards the end of this year I’ve been trying to educate myself a bit about Navy Nurses. I read a wonderful book by Emily Mayhew called “Wounded” that talks about Army nurses during World War I. In fact, World War I opened up so many opportunities for women. In 1917 when the US entered World War I there were only 160 Navy Nurses, and by 1918 there were 1550. Many of these women were loaned to the Army because of a shortage of nurses on the Western Front, and so many Navy nurses served in France in particular. I am a French historian, so that interests me in particular. I have included a picture here taken on the USS Pocahontas en route to France in 1918 featuring 4 Navy nurses.

The holidays are here and I’m sure we are all very busy with family plans and activities. I wanted to take a moment out of my schedule to wish all members of the Society for the History of Navy Medicine a wonderful holiday season. As I think more and more about the centennial commemoration of World War I, I often think of the Christmas truce which occurred 100 Years ago tomorrow night. It is commonly told that on that evening British and German troops put down their arms and began singing carols, eventually visited each other and playing soccer. A similar truce was held on the Eastern Front.

Our Society is made up of people of all backgrounds. I wish everyone Happy Holidays and hope you have a wonderful Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Christmas or whatever celebration you enjoy this time of year.

Annette Finley-Croswhite, Executive Director